Rights Respecting Schools Award


The Rights Respecting Schools Award recognises achievement in putting the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) at the heart of a school’s planning, policies, practice and ethos. A rights-respecting school not only teaches about children’s rights but also models rights and respect in all its relationship: between teachers, adults and pupils, between adults and between pupils. By aiming for this award, we hope to let children and young people in our school community learn about children’s rights by putting them into practice every day.


Through doing this award in our school, we hope to gain a UNICEF Rights Respecting School community where children’s rights are learned, taught, practised, respected, protected and promoted. We hope to have a significant impact on the school by providing a set of values which improve the climate for learning, improve relationships and provide a deeper more cohesive way of working. In addition to this, we are adamant that this award can impact positively with the pupils and adults in our school community. For pupils, it can improve their self-esteem, increase levels of respect, improve attainment and attendance and overall help to provide them with a wider understanding of the world in which we live. For adults in our school community, through aiming for a Rights Respecting School, it can help to strengthen collaborative working, increase consultative approach and provide a platform for parental engagement.


Currently, our Rights Respecting School group meets every Monday at lunchtime and through doing this we have managed to plan various things to help inform others in our school community about the rights of every child. We have attended parent’s nights for a wide variety of year groups in order to raise awareness and survey parents. Also as part of the World’s Largest Lesson, which is a UNICEF initiative, we were able to use this platform to show a short information clip both in the Daily Bulletin. We also issued questionnaires to both staff and pupils in order to provide an idea of where we are now and so that we are able to plan on how best we can move forward. Ultimately, this feedback has been extremely effective with it showing us how many people within our school community are not aware of what the award is. We have tackled this issue specifically in the past couple of weeks by making posters and placing them around the school in order to inform pupils and staff about what we are hoping to achieve.


In the following months, as a group we are planning to recruit junior pupils in order to carry this specific initiative forward next year. We are hoping to deliver additional year group assemblies and presentations to the pupil council and the Senior Management team. We want to issue badges to our Rights Respecting ambassadors and work towards drawing up a whole school charter by focussing on the rights which most relate to our school community specifically. Also look out for our interdisciplinary event with S1 in June in order to raise awareness of the problems facing refugees as part of UNICEF’S Refugee week.Rights Respecting Schools

We hope that you support our group throughout the school in order to achieve this award and use it as an opportunity to learn about your own rights!

Books come to life with Enterprise sculptures.

In 2011 ten beautiful sculptures made from books mysteriously appeared at libraries and cultural institutions across Edinburgh. The sculptures came with a simple message: ‘a library is so much more than a building full of books… a book is so much more than pages full of words… in support of books, libraries, words, ideas’. To this day, no one knows how they arrived and the identity of the sculptor remains a secret.the-tiger-who-came-to-tea

The book sculptures traveled around the country in the Gifted exhibition. This was designed as a tribute to the presence and vitality of libraries and arts institutions in Edinburgh and across Scotland, and to the generosity of the anonymous artist’s gesture. The sculptures were also intended as a gift to the communities which supported such places.the-hobbit

In response to this 1st year Enterprise pupils created their own book sculptures based on a favourite childhood, or current book. Work began by deciding on key characters and events within their book and through initial research and creative thinking pupils began to create paper sculptures suing paper mache. They created a scene or character from the book and used text from their chosen book as the final layer. The book sculptures were displayed in the Enterprise exhibition and Tidelines book exhibition at the Harbour Arts Centre in Irvine.



Thank you to Mrs Bell and her enterprise pupils.

The Book sculptures are currently on display in the library for everyone to see.


Meet the Groups: Chess Club

Since beginning the Leadership course at the start of the year Megan Copeland has shared her enthusiasm for Chess by running a Chess club every Monday Lunchtime. Recently she has started a mini-tournament within the club to encourage the members to meet new people and improve their skills. Although she has not competed recently, Megan has been crowned U18 champion at both the girls and overall section of the Ayrshire wide competition. Her love of Chess began as she was taught to play chess by her dad when she was aged 7. When discussing the chess club she was shocked to realise that this means she has been playing chess for 10 years!While many people play chess to relax Megan enjoys the tactical side of the game as well as the competitive element and wishes to pass this down to other members of the club. From beginners just learning the rules of the game to the more experienced players the chess club provides a place to have fun and meet new people while developing your skills.

The chess club runs every Monday in the Library. All pupils aged 1st to 3rd year are welcome no matter their ability.